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JAPAN FIRMS NOT BIDDING ON KL-SG HIGH SPEED, “RISKY” DUE TO NO FINANCIAL SUPPORT FROM M’SIA GOVT

The decision of Japanese firms to withdraw from the high-speed rail project raises significant questions about its future trajectory. The exit of key players, such as Japan East Railway Co., not only alters the competitive landscape but also opens avenues for other global players.

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Previously… After the HSR project was cancelled by a previous administration in 2021, Anwar’s government resurrected the HSR project in 2023.

However, Japanese firms finally determined that participation in the HSR would be too dangerous without financial help from the Malaysian government, according to Kyodo News, citing Malaysian and Japanese official sources.

Project Cost and Expected Benefits

The Southeast Asian high-speed rail scenario has been evolving rapidly. With the completion of a similar project in Indonesia in 2023, where China Railway International played a pivotal role, the region is witnessing a surge in infrastructural developments. The Malaysian government’s decision to revive the HSR adds a crucial dimension, and the departure of Japanese firms could potentially pave the way for increased Chinese involvement.

A critical aspect of the HSR revival is the substantial projected cost of RM100 billion (S$28.68 billion). While the price tag is significant, the potential benefits in terms of reduced travel time between Singapore and Kuala Lumpur to just 90 minutes could be a game-changer for regional connectivity and economic collaboration.

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Potential Chinese Involvement

The void left by Japanese firms creates an opportunity for Chinese companies to further solidify their presence in the high-speed rail sector within Southeast Asia. With the successful completion of the Indonesian project, China is positioned as a key player, and the HSR project in Malaysia may be the next strategic move in expanding its influence.

As Japanese firms step back, European companies are emerging as potential contenders for the HSR project. Kyodo News suggests that European firms could be considering bids, adding diversity to the pool of participants. The involvement of multiple international players brings a mix of technological expertise and strategic partnerships, enriching the overall project.

Conclusion

In conclusion, the decision of Japanese firms to opt out of the Kuala Lumpur-Singapore High-Speed Rail project introduces a dynamic shift in its dynamics. The interplay between global players, the funding approach of the Malaysian government, and the geopolitical implications make the HSR revival a focal point for regional development. As the bidding deadline approaches on January 15, 2024, the stage is set for a new chapter in Southeast Asia’s high-speed rail narrative.

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